Faculty

Our more than 60 world-renowned faculty include 3 Nobel laureates; 33 members of the National Academy of Sciences; 16 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators; and 4 recipients of the National Medal of Science.

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Angelika Amon examines cell growth and division, and how errors in this process contribute to cancer and aging.

Stephen Bell

Graduate Officer

Stephen Bell probes the cellular machinery that replicates and maintains animal cell chromosomes.

Iain Cheeseman analyzes the process by which cells duplicate, focusing on the molecular machinery that segregates the chromosomes.

Martha Constantine-Paton

Professor Emerita

Martha Constantine-Paton uses a combination of classical and modern genetic tools in mice to study the contributions of specific brain regions to normal behavior.

Joey Davis investigates how cells maintain a delicate internal balance of assembling and dismantling their own machinery — in particular, assemblages of many molecules known as macromolecular complexes.

Frank B. Gertler considers the role of cell shape and movement in developmental defects and diseases.

Alan D. Grossman

Department Head

Alan Grossman studies mechanisms and regulation of DNA replication, gene expression, and horizontal gene transfer in bacteria.

Richard O. Hynes investigates the network of proteins surrounding cells to understand its roles in the spread of cancer throughout the body.

Ankur Jain investigates the role of RNA self-assembly in cellular organization and neurodegenerative disease.

Chris A. Kaiser analyzes protein folding and trafficking in cells.

Monty Krieger studies cell surface receptors and cholesterol and their impact on normal physiology and diseases, such as heart disease and infertility.

Rebecca Lamason investigates what happens when cellular functions are hijacked by unwanted interlopers: namely, the bacteria that engender diseases like spotted fever and meningitis.

Douglas Lauffenburger fosters the interface of bioengineering, quantitative cell biology, and systems biology to determine fundamental aspects of cell dysregulation — identifying and testing new therapeutic ideas.

Troy Littleton is interested in how neuronal connections form and function, and how neurological disease disrupts synaptic communication.

Harvey F. Lodish studies the development of red blood cells and the use of modified red cells for the introduction of novel therapeutics into the human body, as well as the development of brown and white fat cells.

Sebastian Lourido exposes parasite vulnerabilities and harnesses them to treat infectious disease.

Adam C. Martin

Undergrad Officer

Adam C. Martin studies molecular mechanisms that underlie tissue form and function.

Elly Nedivi studies the mechanisms underlying brain circuit plasticity — characterizing the genes and proteins involved, as well as visualizing synaptic and neuronal remodeling in the living mouse brain.

Mary-Lou Pardue

Professor Emerita

Mary-Lou Pardue studied fruit fly chromosomes to better understand chromosome replication, cell division, and related cellular structures.

David Sabatini studies the pathways that regulate growth and metabolism and how they are deregulated in diseases like cancer and diabetes.

Thomas U. Schwartz investigates communication across biological membranes, using structural, biochemical, and genetic tools.

Phillip A. Sharp studies many aspects of gene expression in mammalian cells, including transcription, the roles of non-coding RNAs, and RNA splicing. 

Matthew Vander Heiden is interested in the role that cell metabolism plays in mammalian physiology, with a focus on cancer.

Robert A. Weinberg studies how cancer spreads, what gives cancer stem-cells their unique qualities, and the molecular players involved in the formation of cancer stem cells and metastases.