Faculty

Our more than 60 world-renowned faculty include 3 Nobel laureates; 33 members of the National Academy of Sciences; 16 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators; and 4 recipients of the National Medal of Science.

Filter by Research Area

Tania Baker’s current research explores mechanisms and regulation of enzyme-catalyzed protein unfolding, ATP-dependent protein degradation, and remodeling of the proteome during cellular stress responses.

David Bartel studies molecular pathways that regulate eukaryotic gene expression by affecting the stability or translation of mRNAs.

Stephen Bell

Graduate Officer

Stephen Bell probes the cellular machinery that replicates and maintains animal cell chromosomes.

Laurie A. Boyer investigates the gene regulatory mechanisms that drive heart development and regeneration using embryonic stem cells and mouse models.

Christopher Burge applies a combination of experimental and computational approaches to understand the regulatory codes underlying pre-mRNA splicing and other types of post-transcriptional gene regulation.

Iain Cheeseman analyzes the process by which cells duplicate, focusing on the molecular machinery that segregates the chromosomes.

Joey Davis investigates how cells maintain a delicate internal balance of assembling and dismantling their own machinery — in particular, assemblages of many molecules known as macromolecular complexes.

Catherine Drennan

Undergrad Officer

Catherine Drennan takes “snapshots” of metalloenzymes using crystallography and/or cryo-electron microscopy.

Gerald R. Fink investigates how fungal pathogens invade the body, evade the immune system, and establish an infection.

Maurice Fox

Professor Emeritus

Maurice Fox was instrumental in creating and revising several courses within the department — including 7.50 (Methods and Logic in Molecular Biology) and 7.03 (Genetics) — and studied DNA mutations and recombination before retiring.

Barbara Imperiali studies the biogenesis and myriad functions of glycoconjugates in human health and disease.

Ankur Jain investigates the role of RNA self-assembly in cellular organization and neurodegenerative disease.

Amy E. Keating

Graduate Officer

Amy E. Keating determines how proteins make specific interactions with one another and designs new, synthetic protein-protein interactions.

Jonathan A. King studies what happens when proteins do not fold properly — leading to conditions like cataracts — and works to protect the conditions needed to support biomedical research.

Monty Krieger studies cell surface receptors and cholesterol and their impact on normal physiology and diseases, such as heart disease and infertility.

Rebecca Lamason investigates what happens when cellular functions are hijacked by unwanted interlopers: namely, the bacteria that engender diseases like spotted fever and meningitis.

Michael T. Laub

Associate Dept. Head

Michael T. Laub explores how bacterial cells process information and regulate their own growth and proliferation, as well as how these information-processing capabilities have evolved.

Gene-Wei Li develops quantitative tools to study the regulation and evolution of protein expression at both molecular and systems levels.

Uttam RajBhandary's interests include interactions between RNAs and proteins, focusing on gene expression and gene regulation.

David Sabatini studies the pathways that regulate growth and metabolism and how they are deregulated in diseases like cancer and diabetes.

Leona Samson

Professor Emerita

Leona Samson analyzes toxic chemicals frequently used in cancer chemotherapy to prevent further DNA damage.

Bob Sauer studies intracellular proteolytic machines responsible for protein-quality control and homeostasis.

Thomas U. Schwartz investigates communication across biological membranes, using structural, biochemical, and genetic tools.

Edward Scolnick

Emeritus Faculty

Edward Scolnick has provided critical insights into the genetic underpinnings of a variety of psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and autism.

Phillip A. Sharp studies many aspects of gene expression in mammalian cells, including transcription, the roles of non-coding RNAs, and RNA splicing. 

Anthony J. Sinskey explores the principles of metabolic engineering in both bacteria and plants.

JoAnne Stubbe

Professor Emerita

JoAnne Stubbe studies ribonucleotide reductases — essential enzymes that provide the building blocks for DNA replication, repair and successful targets of multiple clinical drugs.

Matthew Vander Heiden is interested in the role that cell metabolism plays in mammalian physiology, with a focus on cancer.

Graham C. Walker studies DNA repair, mutagenesis, and cellular responses to DNA damage, as well as the symbiotic relationship between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

Jing-Ke Weng studies metabolic evolution in plants and explores the remarkable plant chemodiversity for new commodity chemicals and medicines.

Michael B. Yaffe studies the chain of reactions that controls a cell’s response to stress, cell injury, and DNA damage.