Faculty

Our more than 60 world-renowned faculty include 3 Nobel laureates; 33 members of the National Academy of Sciences; 16 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators; and 4 recipients of the National Medal of Science.

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Laurie A. Boyer investigates the gene regulatory mechanisms that drive heart development and regeneration using embryonic stem cells and mouse models.

Eliezer Calo studies how cells build ribosomes and how dysfunction in ribosome biogenesis and function leads to tissue-specific developmental disorders and cancer.

Martha Constantine-Paton

Professor Emerita

Martha Constantine-Paton uses a combination of classical and modern genetic tools in mice to study the contributions of specific brain regions to normal behavior.

Mary Gehring researches epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation in plants.

Leonard P. Guarente looks at mammal, mouse, and human brains to understand the genetic underpinning of aging and age-related diseases like Alzheimer’s.

Nancy Hopkins

Professor Emerita

Nancy Hopkins worked on the genetics of mouse RNA tumor viruses; on the genetics of early vertebrate development using zebrafish; and on the fish as a cancer model.

H. Robert Horvitz analyzes the roles of genes in animal development and behavior, gaining insight into human disease.

Richard O. Hynes investigates the network of proteins surrounding cells to understand its roles in the spread of cancer throughout the body.

Rudolf Jaenisch uses pluripotent cells (ES and iPS cells) to study the genetic and epigenetic basis of human diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, autism and cancer.

Jacqueline Lees

Associate Dept. Head

Jacqueline Lees develops mouse and zebrafish models, identifying the molecular pathways leading to tumor formation.

Harvey F. Lodish studies the development of red blood cells and the use of modified red cells for the introduction of novel therapeutics into the human body, as well as the development of brown and white fat cells.

Adam C. Martin

Undergrad Officer

Adam C. Martin studies molecular mechanisms that underlie tissue form and function.

Elly Nedivi studies the mechanisms underlying brain circuit plasticity — characterizing the genes and proteins involved, as well as visualizing synaptic and neuronal remodeling in the living mouse brain.

Terry Orr-Weaver

Professor Emerita

Terry Orr-Weaver probed the incredibly complex and coordinated process of development from egg to fertilized embryo and ultimately adult.

Peter Reddien

Associate Dept. Head

Peter Reddien works to unravel one of the greatest mysteries in biology — how organisms regenerate missing body parts.

Hazel Sive studies fundamental mechanisms underlying vertebrate face and brain formation, as well as the molecular underpinnings for neurodevelopmental disorders.

Robert A. Weinberg studies how cancer spreads, what gives cancer stem-cells their unique qualities, and the molecular players involved in the formation of cancer stem cells and metastases.

Omer H. Yilmaz explores the impact of dietary interventions on stem cells, the immune system, and cancer within the intestine.

Richard A. Young explores how and why gene expression differs in healthy versus diseased cells.