H. Robert Horvitz

H. Robert Horvitz

David H. Koch Professor; Member, McGovern Institute for Brain Research; Member, David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

H. Robert Horvitz analyzes the roles of genes in animal development and behavior, gaining insight into human disease.

617-253-4671

Phone

68-425

Office

Nick Anisimov

Assistant

617-253-3162

Assistant Phone

Education

PhD 1974, Harvard University

Research Summary

Our lab examines how genes control animal development and behavior. We use the experimentally tractable nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to identify and analyze molecular and cellular pathways involved in these important areas of biology. Ultimately, we hope to clarify these fundamental biological mechanisms and provide further insight into human disease.

Awards

  • U.S. National Academy of Inventors, Member, 2015
  • American Association for Cancer Research Academy, Fellow, 2013
  • Royal Society of London, Foreign Member, 2009
  • Genetics Society (U.K.), Mendel Medal, 2007
  • Eli Lilly Lecturer Award, 2007
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology, James R Killian Jr Faculty Achievement Award, 2006
  • National Academy of Medicine, Member, 2003
  • American Cancer Society, Medal of Honor, 2002
  • The Nobel Foundation, Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2002
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb, Award for Distinguished Achievement in Neuroscience, 2001
  • March of Dimes, Developmental Biology, 2000
  • Gairdner Foundation, Gairdner Foundation International Award, 1999
  • National Academy of Sciences, Member, 1991
  • American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Fellow, 1989
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science, Fellow, 1989
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute, HHMI Investigator, 1988

Key Publications

  1. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in the developing mammalian brain. Miska, EA, Alvarez-Saavedra, E, Townsend, M, Yoshii, A, Sestan, N, Rakic, P, Constantine-Paton, M, Horvitz, HR. 2004. Genome Biol. 5, R68.
    doi: 10.1186/gb-2004-5-9-r68PMID: 15345052
  2. CED-1 is a transmembrane receptor that mediates cell corpse engulfment in C. elegans. Zhou, Z, Hartwieg, E, Horvitz, HR. 2001. Cell 104, 43-56.
    PMID: 11163239
  3. C. elegans locomotory rate is modulated by the environment through a dopaminergic pathway and by experience through a serotonergic pathway. Sawin, ER, Ranganathan, R, Horvitz, HR. 2000. Neuron 26, 619-31.
    PMID: 10896158
  4. Genetic control of programmed cell death in the nematode C. elegans. Ellis, HM, Horvitz, HR. 1986. Cell 44, 817-29.
    PMID: 3955651
  5. Post-embryonic cell lineages of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Sulston, JE, Horvitz, HR. 1977. Dev. Biol. 56, 110-56.
    PMID: 838129

Recent Publications

  1. Presumptive TRP channel CED-11 promotes cell volume decrease and facilitates degradation of apoptotic cells in. Driscoll, K, Stanfield, GM, Droste, R, Horvitz, HR. 2017. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 114, 8806-8811.
    doi: 10.1073/pnas.1705084114PMID: 28760991
  2. The CDK8 Complex and Proneural Proteins Together Drive Neurogenesis from a Mesodermal Lineage. Luo, S, Horvitz, HR. 2017. Curr. Biol. 27, 661-672.
    doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2017.01.056PMID: 28238659
  3. Insulin-like signalling to the maternal germline controls progeny response to osmotic stress. Burton, NO, Furuta, T, Webster, AK, Kaplan, RE, Baugh, LR, Arur, S, Horvitz, HR. 2017. Nat. Cell Biol. 19, 252-257.
    doi: 10.1038/ncb3470PMID: 28166192
  4. Both the apoptotic suicide pathway and phagocytosis are required for a programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegans. Johnsen, HL, Horvitz, HR. 2016. BMC Biol. 14, 39.
    doi: 10.1186/s12915-016-0262-5PMID: 27185172
  5. The Conserved VPS-50 Protein Functions in Dense-Core Vesicle Maturation and Acidification and Controls Animal Behavior. Paquin, N, Murata, Y, Froehlich, A, Omura, DT, Ailion, M, Pender, CL, Constantine-Paton, M, Horvitz, HR. 2016. Curr. Biol. 26, 862-71.
    doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.01.049PMID: 26948874
  6. Distinct Neural Circuits Control Rhythm Inhibition and Spitting by the Myogenic Pharynx of C. elegans. Bhatla, N, Droste, R, Sando, SR, Huang, A, Horvitz, HR. 2015. Curr. Biol. 25, 2075-89.
    doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.06.052PMID: 26212880
  7. Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Drives Heat Adaptation by Sequestering Fatty Acids. Ma, DK, Li, Z, Lu, AY, Sun, F, Chen, S, Rothe, M, Menzel, R, Sun, F, Horvitz, HR. 2015. Cell 161, 1152-1163.
    doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.04.026PMID: 25981666
  8. Light and hydrogen peroxide inhibit C. elegans Feeding through gustatory receptor orthologs and pharyngeal neurons. Bhatla, N, Horvitz, HR. 2015. Neuron 85, 804-18.
    doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.12.061PMID: 25640076
  9. The translational regulators GCN-1 and ABCF-3 act together to promote apoptosis in C. elegans. Hirose, T, Horvitz, HR. 2014. PLoS Genet. 10, e1004512.
    doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004512PMID: 25101958
  10. The Caenorhabditis elegans iodotyrosine deiodinase ortholog SUP-18 functions through a conserved channel SC-box to regulate the muscle two-pore domain potassium channel SUP-9. de la Cruz, IP, Ma, L, Horvitz, HR. 2014. PLoS Genet. 10, e1004175.
    doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004175PMID: 24586202
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