Faculty

Our more than 60 world-renowned faculty include 3 Nobel laureates; 33 members of the National Academy of Sciences; 16 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators; and 4 recipients of the National Medal of Science.

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Angelika Amon examines cell growth and division, and how errors in this process contribute to cancer and aging.

Eliezer Calo studies how cells build ribosomes and how dysfunction in ribosome biogenesis and function leads to tissue-specific developmental disorders and cancer.

Jianzhu Chen studies the immune system, harnessing the body’s defense force to explore cancer treatment and vaccine development.

Frank B. Gertler considers the role of cell shape and movement in developmental defects and diseases.

Piyush Gupta investigates how alterations in cellular differentiation drive cancer malignancy, focusing on the mechanisms that underlie multidrug resistance and invasive progression.

Michael T. Hemann uses mouse models to combat cancers resistant to chemotherapy.

Nancy Hopkins

Professor Emerita

Nancy Hopkins worked on the genetics of mouse RNA tumor viruses; on the genetics of early vertebrate development using zebrafish; and on the fish as a cancer model.

David Housman studies the biological underpinnings of diseases like Huntington’s, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

Richard O. Hynes investigates the network of proteins surrounding cells to understand its roles in the spread of cancer throughout the body.

Tyler Jacks is interested in the genetic events contributing to the development of cancer, and his group has created a series of mouse strains engineered to carry mutations in genes known to be involved in human cancers.

Douglas Lauffenburger fosters the interface of bioengineering, quantitative cell biology, and systems biology to determine fundamental aspects of cell dysregulation — identifying and testing new therapeutic ideas.

Jacqueline Lees

Associate Dept. Head

Jacqueline Lees develops mouse and zebrafish models, identifying the molecular pathways leading to tumor formation.

Terry Orr-Weaver

Professor Emerita

Terry Orr-Weaver probed the incredibly complex and coordinated process of development from egg to fertilized embryo and ultimately adult.

Aviv Regev pioneers the use of single-cell genomics and other techniques to dissect the molecular networks that regulate genes, define cells and tissues, and influence health and disease.

David Sabatini studies the pathways that regulate growth and metabolism and how they are deregulated in diseases like cancer and diabetes.

Leona Samson

Professor Emerita

Leona Samson analyzes toxic chemicals frequently used in cancer chemotherapy to prevent further DNA damage.

Phillip A. Sharp studies many aspects of gene expression in mammalian cells, including transcription, the roles of non-coding RNAs, and RNA splicing. 

Stefani Spranger studies how the body’s immune system interacts with growing tumors to harness the immune response to fight cancer.

Matthew Vander Heiden is interested in the role that cell metabolism plays in mammalian physiology, with a focus on cancer.

Robert A. Weinberg studies how cancer spreads, what gives cancer stem-cells their unique qualities, and the molecular players involved in the formation of cancer stem cells and metastases.

Michael B. Yaffe studies the chain of reactions that controls a cell’s response to stress, cell injury, and DNA damage.

Omer H. Yilmaz explores the impact of dietary interventions on stem cells, the immune system, and cancer within the intestine.

Richard A. Young explores how and why gene expression differs in healthy versus diseased cells.