Faculty

Our more than 60 world-renowned faculty include 3 Nobel laureates; 33 members of the National Academy of Sciences; 16 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators; and 4 recipients of the National Medal of Science.

Filter by Research Area

David Bartel studies molecular pathways that regulate eukaryotic gene expression by affecting the stability or translation of mRNAs.

Christopher Burge applies a combination of experimental and computational approaches to understand the regulatory codes underlying pre-mRNA splicing and other types of post-transcriptional gene regulation.

Amy E. Keating

Graduate Officer

Amy E. Keating determines how proteins make specific interactions with one another and designs new, synthetic protein-protein interactions.

Eric S. Lander is interested in every aspect of the human genome and its application to medicine.

Douglas Lauffenburger fosters the interface of bioengineering, quantitative cell biology, and systems biology to determine fundamental aspects of cell dysregulation — identifying and testing new therapeutic ideas.

Gene-Wei Li develops quantitative tools to study the regulation and evolution of protein expression at both molecular and systems levels.

Pulin Li is interested in quantitatively understanding how genetic circuits create multicellular behavior in both natural and synthetically engineered systems.

Adam C. Martin

Undergrad Officer

Adam C. Martin studies molecular mechanisms that underlie tissue form and function.

David C. Page examines the genetic differences between males and females — and how these play out in disease, development, and evolution.

Peter Reddien

Associate Dept. Head

Peter Reddien works to unravel one of the greatest mysteries in biology — how organisms regenerate missing body parts.

Aviv Regev pioneers the use of single-cell genomics and other techniques to dissect the molecular networks that regulate genes, define cells and tissues, and influence health and disease.

Michael B. Yaffe studies the chain of reactions that controls a cell’s response to stress, cell injury, and DNA damage.