Faculty

Our more than 60 world-renowned faculty include 3 Nobel laureates; 33 members of the National Academy of Sciences; 16 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigators; and 4 recipients of the National Medal of Science.

Filter by Research Area

Martha Constantine-Paton

Professor Emerita

Before closing her lab, Martha Constantine-Paton used a combination of classical and modern genetic tools in mice to study the contributions of specific brain regions to normal behavior.

Frank Gertler

Professor Emeritus

Before closing his lab, Frank B. Gertler considered the role of cell shape and movement in developmental defects and diseases.

H. Robert Horvitz analyzes the roles of genes in animal development and behavior, gaining insight into human disease.

Siniša Hrvatin studies states of stasis, such as mammalian torpor and hibernation, as a means to harness the potential of these biological adaptations to advance medicine.

Rudolf Jaenisch uses pluripotent cells (ES and iPS cells) to study the genetic and epigenetic basis of human diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, autism and cancer.

Troy Littleton is interested in how neuronal connections form and function, and how neurological disease disrupts synaptic communication.

Elly Nedivi studies the mechanisms underlying brain circuit plasticity — characterizing the genes and proteins involved, as well as visualizing synaptic and neuronal remodeling in the living mouse brain.

Sara Prescott investigates how sensory inputs from within the body control mammalian physiology and behavior.

Edward Scolnick

Professor Emeritus

Edward Scolnick has provided critical insights into the genetic underpinnings of a variety of psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and autism.

Hazel Sive

Professor Emerita

Hazel Sive studies fundamental mechanisms underlying vertebrate face and brain formation, as well as the molecular underpinnings for neurodevelopmental disorders.

Lisa A. Steiner

Professor Emerita

Before closing her lab, Lisa A. Steiner analyzed the zebrafish genome to understand white blood cells and their role in the immune system.

Susumu Tonegawa investigates the biological underpinnings of learning and memory in rodents.

Brady Weissbourd uses jellyfish to study nervous system evolution, development, regeneration, and function.

Matthew Wilson studies rodent learning and memory by recording and manipulating the activity of neurons during behavior and sleep.